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Hub’s future jobs may be in cloud

There are jobs in the cloud.

The rise of cloud computing services – running software and storing files online, rather than on a computer hard drive – is expected to create 20,000 jobs in the Boston area by 2015, according to a report produced for Microsoft Corp. by Framingham research firm IDC Corp.

Most of the jobs will come as companies shift from maintaining their own, expensive computer servers toward cloud services, which allow access to enterprise software and data via the Internet, according to the report, which was scheduled to be released Monday.

Shifting to the cloud could cut costs for companies and help create 1.1 million jobs in North America by the end of 2015 and a global rise in business revenues of $1.1 trillion.

Last year, the United States added 1.8 million new jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The forecast for cloud-related job growth assumes that when companies do not have to spend money on maintaining legacy systems, they will spend it on innovation elsewhere, and that will create new jobs, according to IDC analyst John Gantz.

The large enterprises are moving their computing into the cloud at a lower cost and they can repurpose that money into sales and marketing jobs, said Craig Hodges, general manager of Microsofts Northeast sales division. The report is the companys first analysis of the global impact of cloud computing.

In the Boston area, the primary drivers in the growth of cloud computing are education and financial services businesses, according to the IDC research. Hospitals and government services are slower to move to the cloud because of regulation and security issues, it said.

IDCs Gantz said cloud spending is growing almost five times faster than overall spending on technology. But with total information technology spending in 2011 of $1.7 trillion, the $28 billion spend on cloud services makes it a nascent market.

The report says that more than 50 percent of the job growth related to increasing adoption of cloud services will take place in small and medium-sized businesses. More companies are spending less on IT maintenance, but using the cloud does not amount to outsourcing tech support staff, Gantz said. Instead, those positions are being redefined when companies move to the cloud and away from servicing their own computer servers.

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Hub’s future jobs may be in cloud

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More Flexibility with the 1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server

Accurate hourly billing model enhances server management and performance. Machine capacity of up to 99 cloud servers possible in one contract and Server Management and Monitoring is available with 1&1 Mobile Apps.

Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) March 05, 2012

1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server (DCS) offers users a virtual server environment with full root access. The innovative aspect of this model is found in the adaptability of each machines basic settings that can be changed to suit users own needs over time. It is also possible to switch between either a Linux or Windows operating system. 1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server can be a sophisticated alternative for companies whose resource requirements change frequently or for start-ups that cannot accurately estimate how much computing power they will need for their online project.

If a company using a traditional dedicated server requires an increase in computing power, significant time and resources are needed to change configurations over to a new machine. 1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server eliminates such a time consuming process by enhancing usability and accessibility. If, for example a promotional campaign or one-time project attracts more website visitors than usual, this cloud server would allow the performance parameters to be increased with the help of an intuitive slider for expanding computing power up to 6 cores, 24 GB RAM and 800 GB of hard disk space. An upgrade or downgrade to a server would be complete in less than five minutes.

For users whose online projects exploit the capacity of a single cloud server completely, 1&1 offers a multi-function virtual infrastructure. That means that up to 99 virtual machines can be added to an existing contract and ordered conveniently via the users 1&1 Control Panel. After setup, users can configure each Dynamic Cloud Server as usual, with individual capabilities to start, stop, reset or delete them.

Managing and monitoring the server on-the-go is also not a problem. 1&1 provides you with mobile apps for the DCS that can be downloaded for free via the following links:

http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/1-1-mobile-monitoring/id409369112

[http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/cloud-server-management/id392277406?mt=8

[https://market.android.com/details?id=com.oneandone.mobile.monitoring.server

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.unitedinternet.cloudserver

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“Cloud storage served from an array would cost $2 a gigabyte”

New Australian cloud storage operator Haylix says building a cloud on storage arrays would mean prices of $2 a gigabyte, rather than the 12 cents it has been able to achieve by building a cloud out of servers.

Arrays are great for active servers with high I/O, said Michael Richardson, a Manager at Halyix. But the company has instead cooked up a cloud from lots and lots of Dell servers and OpenStack, a combination it says is more affordable and flexible than even dedicated cloud arrays like EMC’s Atmos.

Richardson also feels his homebrew cloud allows Haylix to differentiate in ways that would not be possible if it used off-the-shelf cloud kit. It won’t be enough just to say we are Australian, he said. We are an engineering company at heart. It was not enough for us to re-badge a service.

One example of that engineering-led differentiation is deep integration with Akamai, thanks to tweaks to OpenStack. The result is a feature Richardson hopes will make the new service attractive to customers beyond Australia by reducing latency.

Another differentiation is a user interface which, in a demonstration to The Register, appeared rather more user-friendly than that officered by Amazon Web Services.

Richardson would not disclose just which Dell servers Haylix will employ or even which form factor his machines possess, but did confirm the company’s VIA Nano-powered servers did not make his shopping list. He did confirm that Haylix has many terabytes of live storage and many more terabytes in stock but not yet online.

The company also intends to introduce a cloud computing product later in 2012.

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SingleHop Introduces the Hosting Industry's First Customer Bill of Rights

CHICAGO, March 5, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — SingleHop, Inc., a leading dedicated server and cloud hosting provider, announced the launch of its Customer Bill of Rights, a new type of Service Level Agreement (SLA). The company created the program by publicly posting its rigid internal timing standards on everything from hardware replacements to server deployment. Strict internal SLAs have always been a part of SingleHop’s infrastructure and are now the foundation of the Customer Bill of Rights, a unique program that offers clear and simple financial benefits to its customers.

“We know that setting the right expectations, and keeping our promises, are two of the major factors that drive customer satisfaction. With the Bill of Rights our customers always know exactly what to expect, how long it will take, and what happens if we under-deliver,” said Dan Ushman, Chief Marketing Officer.

Sample Features of the Customer Bill of Rights:

Service

Their Guarantee

Credit Received

First Response to a Support Ticket

1 Hour

5%

Updated Ticket Frequency

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Online Education Innovator Gives Virtual Internet Cloud Services an A+

Virtual Internet delivers high availability cloud hosting solution to rapidly expanding Grade Results

Providence, Utah (PRWEB) March 01, 2012

Grade Results provides one-to-one online tutoring and interactive, multimedia courseware that is completely customized for each student. The company approached Virtual Internet looking for a high-availability hosting environment that would be able to support their online learning platform and allow the flexibility to scale in tandem with the rapid growth that Grade Results is currently undergoing.

Prior to Virtual Internet, we had dedicated servers with another hosting provider but we outgrew the solution, and purchasing additional dedicated servers would have made for an unnecessarily complex infrastructure, said Grade Results founder and COO, Craig Ullman.

Virtual Internet worked to understand Grade Results existing infrastructure set up and current and future business goals, then proposed a cloud hosting solution that would deliver the flexibility to scale the service as and when needed.

Grade Results is an online service and our students are logging on 24/7 from across the United States to access our courses, said Ullman, so it was crucial that our hosting provider be able to deliver a high availability platform. Grade Results evaluated several other cloud service providers, but selected Virtual Internet because of its enterprise-class, always up hosting environment, technical support and very competitive pricing. Virtual Internet offered the best bang for the buck; it ended up being an easy choice.

Choosing an Infrastructure-as-a-Service model for their hosting requirements has eliminated the necessity to employ infrastructure technicians in house. Instead, Grade Results has a team of software developers and designers that focus on innovating and driving the Grade Results business offerings forward.

Having fast and reliable technical support from Virtual Internet has been invaluable to us. With Virtual Internet, we have the confidence that we can keep growing our business without running into any limits with our supporting IT infrastructure, said Ullman. With the Virtual Internet cloud hosting solution in place, we can grow to support massive numbers of users.

Grade Results serves clients throughout the Southeast and Mid-South regions of the United States, and recently opened new offices in Boston, Massachusetts and Madison, Wisconsin.

“Grade Results is a great example of how Virtual Internet can provide a valuable service to a busy customer to which high-availability is paramount” commented Patrick McCarthy, Managing Director, Virtual Internet. “Because we provide Infrastructure-as-a-Service, business IT leaders can concentrate on driving their organization forward, rather than having the constant worry of whether they have the agile and reliable IT infrastructure in place to support business demand.”

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RightMobileApps White Label Program – Video


01-03-2012 18:10 RightMobileApps has a white label program to help you grow your company by offering mobile apps to your clients. Build apps without any programming knowledge whatsoever in minutes. RightMobileApps is powered by Top-Tier, Secure, and Scalable cloud servers. Create an additional revenue stream for your company with mobile apps.

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Leap Day brings down Microsoft's Azure cloud service

Microsoft has been running its Azure cloud services since 2009, touting the technology as a robust and secure way to built and deploy cloud-based applications, Web sites, and other technology that can be available to users anywhere they can get Internet access and without having to worry about complicated stuff like VPNs and secure tunnels back to corporate HQ. However, on Wednesday the service experienced a 12-hour outage thanks to one of the most embarrassing bugs a programmer can make: Azure didnt handle February 29 leap day correctly.

Without noting the specific problem, Azure lead engineer Bill Laing noted in a blog post that the outage was determined to have been caused by a time calculation that was incorrect for the leap year. Data Center Knowledges Rich Miller reported that Microsoft attributed the problem to a cert issue which would likely mean that certificated used to establish secure communications and access between related systems failed to validate correctly on February 29. Liang apologized for the outage and the inconvenience to customers, and promised a full analysis would be published within ten days.

The incident serves to highlight the essential problem with all cloud services: every once in a while, they will treat their customers to a bright, sunny, cloudless day. Back in April, Amazons cloud services suffered a sustained crash that resulted in the loss of customer data; in August both Amazon and Microsofts cloud services were taken offline in Europe by a power failure in Dublin, Ireland.

[Azure advertisement: Microsoft]

This article was originally posted on Digital Trends

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Leap Day brings down Microsoft's Azure cloud service

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Web Host 1&1 Provides More Flexibility with Dynamic Cloud Server

2 March 2012, London: 1&1 Internet Ltd., http://www.1and1.co.uk, a global leader amongst Web hosting providers, has made its Dynamic Cloud Server now even more flexible. From now on, configurations for all essential features such as CPU or RAM can be scaled hourly as needed. For small and medium businesses, the innovation of such flexibility with server resources allows them to manage their IT needs just as efficiently as major corporations who leverage such tools for long-time success. This lowers the costs of small business IT and enhances the competitive nature of the market.

1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server (DCS) offers users a virtual server environment with full root access. The innovative aspect of this model is found in the adaptability of each machines basic settings that can be changed to suit users own needs over time. It is also possible to switch between either a Linux or Windows operating system. 1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server can be a sophisticated alternative for companies whose resource requirements change frequently or for start-ups that cannot accurately estimate how much computing power they will need for their online project.

If a company using a traditional dedicated server requires an increase in computing power, significant time and resources is needed to change configurations over to a new machine. 1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server eliminates such a time consuming process by enhancing usability and accessibility. If, for example ,a promotional campaign or one-time project attracts more website visitors than usual, this cloud server would allow the performance parameters to be increased with the help of an intuitive slider for expanding computing power up to 6 cores, 24 GB RAM and 800 GB of hard disk space. An upgrade or downgrade to a server would be complete in less than five minutes.

For users whose online projects exploit the capacity of a single cloud server completely, 1&1 offers a multi-function virtual infrastructure. That means that up to 99 virtual machines can be added to an existing contract and ordered conveniently via the users 1&1 Control Panel. After setup, users can configure each Dynamic Cloud Server as usual, with individual capabilities to start, stop, reset or delete them.

Managing and monitoring the server on-the-go is also not a problem. 1&1 provides mobile apps for the DCS that can be downloaded for free via the following links:

http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/1-1-mobile-monitoring/id409369112

http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/cloud-server-management/id392277406?mt=8

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.oneandone.mobile.monitoring.server

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.unitedinternet.cloudserver

1&1 mobile server apps can be used with all current iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices as well as mobile phones running the Android operating system.

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Web Host 1&1 Provides More Flexibility with Dynamic Cloud Server

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AMD Acquires Cloud Server Maker SeaMicro for $334M USD

AMD’s heavily threaded Bulldozer, APUs, GCN are good fits for Seamicro’s compact cloud computing servers

Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) has struggled mightily in the server market in recent years, seeing its market share fall from nearly 15 percent in 2007 to less than half that — roughly 6.5 percent in 2011.

I. AMD Server Division — In Need of a Turnaround

AMD can try to write off part of its struggles to rival Intel Corp. (INTC) usinganti-competitive techniquesto squelch its performance during its strong years in the middle of the last decade, a big part of the troubles have come due to AMD’strailing die shrink timing, which has not improved since itspun off its fabs. While AMD finallydropped a new architecture (Bulldozer) in Sept. 2011, it disappointed in clock speeds and power performance — something that may be attributable to die shrinks. Difficulty getting to 32 nm may have left AMD with too little time to thoroughly test and refine the new cores.

Approximately 21.89 percent of AMD’s market share is tied up in its server sales, so clearly this is a major issue for the company and its shareholders. AMD desperately needed a new tactic. Whileallowing competitive interplaybetween Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Comp., Ltd. (TPE:2330) and GlobalFoundries in die shrinks may be a potential long term solution, AMD needed something more immediate.

That’s why the news of its acquisition of SeaMicro for $334M USD (a mix of $281M USD cash and stock) is a bit surprising, but a bit unsurprising. The small 80-person Silicon Valley server maker is known as a premium maker ofhighly dense and power-efficient servers. It sells heavily to large-scale cloud computing businesses.

The move is also a boon toSanta Clara, California manufacturer NBS. Unlike Apple, Inc. (AAPL), Hewlett-Packard Comp. (HPQ), Dell, Inc. (DELL) and others, SeaMicro doesn’t have its servers assembled by Chinese laborers working under sweatshop like conditions. It’s made in America, by blue collar workers earning a respectable living.

While it only spends a tenth of the research and development budget (~$50M USD per year) as Dell or HP, SeaMicro’s product is viewed as very competitive from a technology basis. But SeaMicro can work intimately with its American manufacturing partner, building prototypes, trialing optimizations, and working out bugs before production hits.

SeaMicro currently exclusivelysells Intel-based servers– a mixture of Xeon (Sandy Bridge) basedtightly-packed 10 RU designsand mixed 10 RU designsincorporating Intel Atom chips for lighter workloads. The Atom servers use the dual-core 64-bit Atom N570 chip (8.5W TDP). SeaMicro’s unique 10 RU form factorsqueezes one to two tower racks into a single compact box-like form factor.

SeaMicro claims four-fold power reduction and six-fold space reduction by eliminating the typical busy server chipset to just three chips, via proprietary interconnect technology.

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AMD Acquires Cloud Server Maker SeaMicro for $334M USD

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