How would one operate a Cryptocurrency Mining Pool and …

Please notice questions 12 through 14 in the FAQs of the notice. Of particular note are questions 13 and 14:

Q-12: Is a payment made using virtual currency subject to information reporting?

A-12: A payment made using virtual currency is subject to information reporting to the same extent as any other payment made in property. For example, a person who in the course of a trade or business makes a payment of fixed and determinable income using virtual currency with a value of $600 or more to a U.S. non-exempt recipient in a taxable year is required to report the payment to the IRS and to the payee. Examples of payments of fixed and determinable income include rent, salaries, wages, premiums, annuities, and compensation.

Q-13: Is a person who in the course of a trade or business makes a payment using virtual currency worth $600 or more to an independent contractor for performing services required to file an information return with the IRS?

A-13: Generally, a person who in the course of a trade or business makes a payment of $600 or more in a taxable year to an independent contractor for the performance of services is required to report that payment to the IRS and to the payee on Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income. Payments of virtual currency required to be reported on Form 1099-MISC should be reported using the fair market value of the virtual currency in U.S. dollars as of the date of payment. The payment recipient may have income even if the recipient does not receive a Form 1099-MISC. See the Instructions to Form 1099-MISC and the General Instructions for Certain Information Returns for more information. For payments to non-U.S. persons, see Publication 515, Withholding of Tax on Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Entities. (Bolding Added)

Q-14: Are payments made using virtual currency subject to backup withholding?

A-14: Payments made using virtual currency are subject to backup withholding to the same extent as other payments made in property. Therefore, payors making reportable payments using virtual currency must solicit a taxpayer identification number (TIN) from the payee. The payor must backup withhold from the payment if a TIN is not obtained prior to payment or if the payor receives notification from the IRS that backup withholding is required. See Publication 1281, Backup Withholding for Missing and Incorrect Name/TINs, for more information. (Bolding added)

If you are going to operate a mine pool, you will want to carefully review the publications mentioned above to make sure of reporting. For any miners you will supply, you will want to get their SSN, ITIN, or EIN through a W-9. If they are a foreign entity, see Pub 515 about those requirements. If any individual/entity refuses to provide you with their information, take note of the Backup Withholding requirement mentioned in Publication 1281 because the IRS will hold you responsible for these taxes. It is entirely possible that an individual/entity does not give you accurate information. When this happens, the IRS will advise you that their reportable income amounts are subject to backup witholding (28% of their reportable income amounts).

There’s obviously more to this, but hopefully this overview provides guidance for you so you can plan your endeavor.

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How would one operate a Cryptocurrency Mining Pool and …

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