Category Archives: Encryption

Download BestCrypt Volume Encryption 3.78.05 / 4.01.09 Beta

BestCrypt Volume Encryption is a comprehensive and practical program that provides transparent encryption of all the data stored in your disk devices, regardless of their type. It allows you to encrypt modern volumes, MS-DOS style disk partitions and various Windows 8 storage spaces.

Once you launch the application, you will notice that all the available partitions are listed in the main window, no matter the type of file system they are, be it NTFS, FAT or FAT32. It encrypts each partition you want and allows you to get access to them without keeping in mind all the necessary aspects regarding the physical location of the volume.

For those who have worked with the Disk Management feature (that each Windows operating system comes with), they will surely know how to work with this application since its main window is quite similar with the aforementioned utility, except for the menus. Basic details about each volume are also displayed, so you can easily view each ones capacity, status, file system type, volume type and algorithm.

Moreover, as BestCrypt Volume Encryption allows you to encrypt data with strong algorithms, namely AES (Rijndael), RC6, Serpent and Twofish, you can rest assured that all your data is secured against unauthorized users.

When it comes to encrypting the selected volume, you are able to choose the algorithm you are interested in, select the format mode, then specify the password that will protect your entire volume. In case you dont complete the encryption procedure, the application will notify you at a predefined period of time.

Another important function of BestCrypt Volume Encryption is that it allows you to manage passwords for encrypted volumes in several ways. In case you want to insert a new password, simply choose the volume you are interested in, then run the Add Password command, from the Volume menu.

To sum things up, BestCrypt Volume Encryption enables you to encrypt any volume you want with ease, so all your data will stay protects against unauthorized access. Also, you are able to boot encrypted volumes only from trusted network.

Volume encryptor Encrypt volume HDD encryption Encrypt Encryptor HDD Disk

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Download BestCrypt Volume Encryption 3.78.05 / 4.01.09 Beta

End-to-end encryption – Wikipedia

End-to-end encryption (E2EE) is a system of communication where only the communicating users can read the messages. In principle, it prevents potential eavesdroppers including telecom providers, Internet providers, and even the provider of the communication service from being able to access the cryptographic keys needed to decrypt the conversation.[1] The systems are designed to defeat any attempts at surveillance or tampering because no third parties can decipher the data being communicated or stored. For example, companies that use end-to-end encryption are unable to hand over texts of their customers’ messages to the authorities.[2]

In an E2EE system, encryption keys must only be known to the communicating parties. To achieve this goal, E2EE systems can encrypt data using a pre-arranged string of symbols, called a pre-shared secret (PGP), or a one-time secret derived from such a pre-shared secret (DUKPT). They can also negotiate a secret key on the spot using Diffie-Hellman key exchange (OTR).[3]

As of 2016, typical server-based communications systems do not include end-to-end encryption. These systems can only guarantee the protection of communications between clients and servers, meaning that users have to trust the third parties who are running the servers with the original texts. End-to-end encryption is regarded as safer because it reduces the number of parties who might be able to interfere or break the encryption.[4] In the case of instant messaging, users may use a third-party client to implement an end-to-end encryption scheme over an otherwise non-E2EE protocol.[5]

Some non-E2EE systems, such as Lavabit and Hushmail, have described themselves as offering “end-to-end” encryption when they did not.[6] Other systems, such as Telegram and Google Allo, have been criticized for not having end-to-end encryption, which they offer, enabled by default.[7][8]

Some encrypted backup and file sharing services provide client-side encryption. The encryption they offer is here not referred to as end-to-end encryption, because the services are not meant for sharing messages between users. However, the term “end-to-end encryption” is often used as a synonym for client-side encryption.[citation needed]

End-to-end encryption ensures that data is transferred securely between endpoints. But, rather than try to break the encryption, an eavesdropper may impersonate a message recipient (during key exchange or by substituting his public key for the recipient’s), so that messages are encrypted with a key known to the attacker. After decrypting the message, the snoop can then encrypt it with a key that they share with the actual recipient, or their public key in case of asymmetric systems, and send the message on again to avoid detection. This is known as a man-in-the-middle attack.[1][9]

Most end-to-end encryption protocols include some form of endpoint authentication specifically to prevent MITM attacks. For example, one could rely on certification authorities or a web of trust.[10] An alternative technique is to generate cryptographic hashes (fingerprints) based on the communicating users public keys or shared secret keys. The parties compare their fingerprints using an outside (out-of-band) communication channel that guarantees integrity and authenticity of communication (but not necessarily secrecy), before starting their conversation. If the fingerprints match, there is in theory, no man in the middle.[1]

When displayed for human inspection, fingerprints are usually encoded into hexadecimal strings. These strings are then formatted into groups of characters for readability. For example, a 128-bit MD5 fingerprint would be displayed as follows:

Some protocols display natural language representations of the hexadecimal blocks.[11] As the approach consists of a one-to-one mapping between fingerprint blocks and words, there is no loss in entropy. The protocol may choose to display words in the user’s native (system) language.[11] This can, however, make cross-language comparisons prone to errors.[12] In order to improve localization, some protocols have chosen to display fingerprints as base 10 strings instead of hexadecimal or natural language strings.[13][12] Modern messaging applications can also display fingerprints as QR codes that users can scan off each other’s devices.[13]

The end-to-end encryption paradigm does not directly address risks at the communications endpoints themselves. Each user’s computer can still be hacked to steal his or her cryptographic key (to create a MITM attack) or simply read the recipients decrypted messages both in real time and from log files. Even the most perfectly encrypted communication pipe is only as secure as the mailbox on the other end.[1] Major attempts to increase endpoint security have been to isolate key generation, storage and cryptographic operations to a smart card such as Google’s Project Vault.[14] However, since plaintext input and output are still visible to the host system, malware can monitor conversations in real time. A more robust approach is to isolate all sensitive data to a fully air gapped computer.[15] PGP has been recommended by experts for this purpose:

If I really had to trust my life to a piece of software, I would probably use something much less flashy GnuPG, maybe, running on an isolated computer locked in a basement.

However, as Bruce Schneier points out, Stuxnet developed by US and Israel successfully jumped air gap and reached Natanz nuclear plant’s network in Iran.[16] To deal with key exfiltration with malware, one approach is to split the Trusted Computing Base behind two unidirectionally connected computers that prevent either insertion of malware, or exfiltration of sensitive data with inserted malware.[17]

A backdoor is usually a secret method of bypassing normal authentication or encryption in a computer system, a product, or an embedded device, etc[18]. Companies may also willingly or unwillingly introduce backdoors to their software that help subvert key negotiation or bypass encryption altogether. In 2013, information leaked by Edward Snowden showed that Skype had a backdoor which allowed Microsoft to hand over their users’ messages to the NSA despite the fact that those messages were officially end-to-end encrypted.[19][20]

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End-to-end encryption – Wikipedia

Download Symantec Encryption Desktop 10.4.0 Build 1100

Having private information in emails end up in the wrong hands is a worst-case scenario, especially in the corporate environment. Leaving aside the encryption capabilities provided by any reputable email client, the end-to-end email encryption provided by Symantec Encryption Desktop can automatically safeguard the content in the user’s emails, making the transfer between source and destination clients much more difficult to intercept.

Symantec Encryption Desktop is compatible with the most popular email clients, namely Microsoft Outlook, Exchange and Office 365, Windows Live Mail, Thunderbird, Lotus Notes / Domino Server, and can also encrypt data on Exchange, IBM Domino, and vSphere servers.

In its endeavor to achieve unbreakable data protection, it relies on PGP technology and uses strong public key algorithms, such as DSA (1024-bit keys only), RSA (up to 4096-bit keys), and Diffie-Hellman. Popular mail protocols are supported (POP3, SMTP, IMAP, MAPI, and Lotus Notes).

To benefit from automatic email encryption, users must create a new PGP key for their email account and configure the security policies they want Symantec Encryption Desktop to apply. Aside from the default policies, users can create additional rules for message encoding. Advanced messaging safety standards are supported, such as PGP/MIME RFC 3156, S/MIME v3 RFC 2633, X.509 v3, or OpenPGP RFC 4880.

While its main purpose is to secure email content, Symantec Encryption Desktop also delivers additional data protection tools. It can create so-called PGP Zips, meaning it can encrypt the contents of any folder on the computer. Going even further, it can encrypt entire disks or partitions, rendering the computer unable to boot in case anyone tries to break into it without permission.

Additionally, it enables users to generate virtual disks, each having its own unique PGP key, where sensitive data can be stored safely. And, as expected, it also comprises a data wiping tool that can shred important files users want to get rid of permanently.

Having Symantec’s proven technology at its core, the Encryption Desktop utility relies on user-generated PGP keys to protect important information that is transferred from and to email clients, as well as data stored locally on the user’s computer. What’s more, it can be used for secure file sharing and allows users to encrypt or sign data in opened windows or located in the clipboard.

Email encryption Encrypt disk End-to-end encryption Encryption Email Sign Encrypt

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Download Symantec Encryption Desktop 10.4.0 Build 1100

HTTPS – Wikipedia

HTTP Secure (HTTPS) is an extension of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) for secure communication over a computer network, and is widely used on the Internet.[1][2] In HTTPS, the communication protocol is encrypted using Transport Layer Security (TLS), or formerly, its predecessor, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). The protocol is therefore also often referred to as HTTP over TLS,[3] or HTTP over SSL.

The principal motivation for HTTPS is authentication of the accessed website and protection of the privacy and integrity of the exchanged data while in transit. It protects against man-in-the-middle attacks. The bidirectional encryption of communications between a client and server protects against eavesdropping and tampering of the communication.[4] In practice, this provides a reasonable assurance that one is communicating without interference by attackers with the website that one intended to communicate with, as opposed to an impostor.

Historically, HTTPS connections were primarily used for payment transactions on the World Wide Web, e-mail and for sensitive transactions in corporate information systems.[citation needed] Since 2018[update][citation needed], HTTPS is used more often by webusers than the original non-secure HTTP, primarily to protect page authenticity on all types of websites; secure accounts; and keep user communications, identity, and web browsing private.

The Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) scheme HTTPS has identical usage syntax to the HTTP scheme. However, HTTPS signals the browser to use an added encryption layer of SSL/TLS to protect the traffic. SSL/TLS is especially suited for HTTP, since it can provide some protection even if only one side of the communication is authenticated. This is the case with HTTP transactions over the Internet, where typically only the server is authenticated (by the client examining the server’s certificate).

HTTPS creates a secure channel over an insecure network. This ensures reasonable protection from eavesdroppers and man-in-the-middle attacks, provided that adequate cipher suites are used and that the server certificate is verified and trusted.

Because HTTPS piggybacks HTTP entirely on top of TLS, the entirety of the underlying HTTP protocol can be encrypted. This includes the request URL (which particular web page was requested), query parameters, headers, and cookies (which often contain identity information about the user). However, because host (website) addresses and port numbers are necessarily part of the underlying TCP/IP protocols, HTTPS cannot protect their disclosure. In practice this means that even on a correctly configured web server, eavesdroppers can infer the IP address and port number of the web server (sometimes even the domain name e.g. http://www.example.org, but not the rest of the URL) that one is communicating with, as well as the amount (data transferred) and duration (length of session) of the communication, though not the content of the communication.[4]

Web browsers know how to trust HTTPS websites based on certificate authorities that come pre-installed in their software. Certificate authorities (such as Let’s Encrypt, Digicert, Comodo, GoDaddy and GlobalSign) are in this way being trusted by web browser creators to provide valid certificates. Therefore, a user should trust an HTTPS connection to a website if and only if all of the following are true:

HTTPS is especially important over insecure networks (such as public Wi-Fi access points), as anyone on the same local network can packet-sniff and discover sensitive information not protected by HTTPS. Additionally, many free to use and paid WLAN networks engage in packet injection in order to serve their own ads on webpages. However, this can be exploited maliciously in many ways, such as injecting malware onto webpages and stealing users’ private information.[5]

HTTPS is also very important for connections over the Tor anonymity network, as malicious Tor nodes can damage or alter the contents passing through them in an insecure fashion and inject malware into the connection. This is one reason why the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Tor project started the development of HTTPS Everywhere,[4] which is included in the Tor Browser Bundle.[6]

As more information is revealed about global mass surveillance and criminals stealing personal information, the use of HTTPS security on all websites is becoming increasingly important regardless of the type of Internet connection being used.[7][8] While metadata about individual pages that a user visits is not sensitive, when combined, they can reveal a lot about the user and compromise the user’s privacy.[9][10][11]

Deploying HTTPS also allows the use of HTTP/2 (or its predecessor, the now-deprecated protocol SPDY), that are new generations of HTTP, designed to reduce page load times, size and latency.

It is recommended to use HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) with HTTPS to protect users from man-in-the-middle attacks, especially SSL stripping.[11][12]

HTTPS should not be confused with the little-used Secure HTTP (S-HTTP) specified in RFC 2660.

As of April2018[update], 33.2% of Alexa top 1,000,000 websites use HTTPS as default,[13] 57.1% of the Internet’s 137,971 most popular websites have a secure implementation of HTTPS,[14] and 70% of page loads (measured by Firefox Telemetry) use HTTPS.[15]

Most browsers display a warning if they receive an invalid certificate. Older browsers, when connecting to a site with an invalid certificate, would present the user with a dialog box asking whether they wanted to continue. Newer browsers display a warning across the entire window. Newer browsers also prominently display the site’s security information in the address bar. Extended validation certificates turn the address bar green in newer browsers. Most browsers also display a warning to the user when visiting a site that contains a mixture of encrypted and unencrypted content.

Most web browsers alert the user when visiting sites that have invalid security certificates.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, opining that “In an ideal world, every web request could be defaulted to HTTPS”, has provided an add-on called HTTPS Everywhere for Mozilla Firefox that enables HTTPS by default for hundreds of frequently used websites. A beta version of this plugin is also available for Google Chrome and Chromium.[16][17]

The security of HTTPS is that of the underlying TLS, which typically uses long-term public and private keys to generate a short-term session key, which is then used to encrypt the data flow between client and server. X.509 certificates are used to authenticate the server (and sometimes the client as well). As a consequence, certificate authorities and public key certificates are necessary to verify the relation between the certificate and its owner, as well as to generate, sign, and administer the validity of certificates. While this can be more beneficial than verifying the identities via a web of trust, the 2013 mass surveillance disclosures drew attention to certificate authorities as a potential weak point allowing man-in-the-middle attacks.[18][19] An important property in this context is forward secrecy, which ensures that encrypted communications recorded in the past cannot be retrieved and decrypted should long-term secret keys or passwords be compromised in the future. Not all web servers provide forward secrecy.[20][needs update]

A site must be completely hosted over HTTPS, without having part of its contents loaded over HTTPfor example, having scripts loaded insecurelyor the user will be vulnerable to some attacks and surveillance. Also having only a certain page that contains sensitive information (such as a log-in page) of a website loaded over HTTPS, while having the rest of the website loaded over plain HTTP, will expose the user to attacks. On a site that has sensitive information somewhere on it, every time that site is accessed with HTTP instead of HTTPS, the user and the session will get exposed. Similarly, cookies on a site served through HTTPS have to have the secure attribute enabled.[11]

HTTPS URLs begin with “https://” and use port 443 by default, whereas HTTP URLs begin with “http://” and use port 80 by default.

HTTP is not encrypted and is vulnerable to man-in-the-middle and eavesdropping attacks, which can let attackers gain access to website accounts and sensitive information, and modify webpages to inject malware or advertisements. HTTPS is designed to withstand such attacks and is considered secure against them (with the exception of older, deprecated versions of SSL).

HTTP operates at the highest layer of the TCP/IP model, the Application layer; as does the TLS security protocol (operating as a lower sublayer of the same layer), which encrypts an HTTP message prior to transmission and decrypts a message upon arrival. Strictly speaking, HTTPS is not a separate protocol, but refers to use of ordinary HTTP over an encrypted SSL/TLS connection.

Everything in the HTTPS message is encrypted, including the headers, and the request/response load. With the exception of the possible CCA cryptographic attack described in the limitations section below, the attacker can only know that a connection is taking place between the two parties and their domain names and IP addresses.

To prepare a web server to accept HTTPS connections, the administrator must create a public key certificate for the web server. This certificate must be signed by a trusted certificate authority for the web browser to accept it without warning. The authority certifies that the certificate holder is the operator of the web server that presents it. Web browsers are generally distributed with a list of signing certificates of major certificate authorities so that they can verify certificates signed by them.

Let’s Encrypt, launched in April 2016,[21] provides free and automated SSL/TLS certificates to websites.[22] According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, “Let’s Encrypt” will make switching from HTTP to HTTPS “as easy as issuing one command, or clicking one button.”[23]. The majority of web hosts and cloud providers already leverage Let’s Encrypt, providing free certificates to their customers.

The system can also be used for client authentication in order to limit access to a web server to authorized users. To do this, the site administrator typically creates a certificate for each user, a certificate that is loaded into their browser. Normally, that contains the name and e-mail address of the authorized user and is automatically checked by the server on each reconnect to verify the user’s identity, potentially without even entering a password.

An important property in this context is perfect forward secrecy (PFS). Possessing one of the long-term asymmetric secret keys used to establish an HTTPS session should not make it easier to derive the short-term session key to then decrypt the conversation, even at a later time. DiffieHellman key exchange (DHE) and Elliptic curve DiffieHellman key exchange (ECDHE) are in 2013 the only ones known to have that property. Only 30% of Firefox, Opera, and Chromium Browser sessions use it, and nearly 0% of Apple’s Safari and Microsoft Internet Explorer sessions.[20] Among the larger internet providers, only Google supports PFS since 2011[update] (State of September 2013).[citation needed]

A certificate may be revoked before it expires, for example because the secrecy of the private key has been compromised. Newer versions of popular browsers such as Firefox,[24] Opera,[25] and Internet Explorer on Windows Vista[26] implement the Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) to verify that this is not the case. The browser sends the certificate’s serial number to the certificate authority or its delegate via OCSP and the authority responds, telling the browser whether the certificate is still valid.[27]

SSL and TLS encryption can be configured in two modes: simple and mutual. In simple mode, authentication is only performed by the server. The mutual version requires the user to install a personal client certificate in the web browser for user authentication.[28] In either case, the level of protection depends on the correctness of the implementation of software and the cryptographic algorithms in use.

SSL/TLS does not prevent the indexing of the site by a web crawler, and in some cases the URI of the encrypted resource can be inferred by knowing only the intercepted request/response size.[29] This allows an attacker to have access to the plaintext (the publicly available static content), and the encrypted text (the encrypted version of the static content), permitting a cryptographic attack.

Because TLS operates at a protocol level below that of HTTP, and has no knowledge of the higher-level protocols, TLS servers can only strictly present one certificate for a particular address and port combination.[30] In the past, this meant that it was not feasible to use name-based virtual hosting with HTTPS. A solution called Server Name Indication (SNI) exists, which sends the hostname to the server before encrypting the connection, although many old browsers do not support this extension. Support for SNI is available since Firefox 2, Opera 8, Safari 2.1, Google Chrome 6, and Internet Explorer 7 on Windows Vista.[31][32][33]

From an architectural point of view:

A sophisticated type of man-in-the-middle attack called SSL stripping was presented at the Blackhat Conference 2009. This type of attack defeats the security provided by HTTPS by changing the https: link into an http: link, taking advantage of the fact that few Internet users actually type “https” into their browser interface: they get to a secure site by clicking on a link, and thus are fooled into thinking that they are using HTTPS when in fact they are using HTTP. The attacker then communicates in clear with the client.[34] This prompted the development of a countermeasure in HTTP called HTTP Strict Transport Security.

HTTPS has been shown vulnerable to a range of traffic analysis attacks. Traffic analysis attacks are a type of side-channel attack that relies on variations in the timing and size of traffic in order to infer properties about the encrypted traffic itself. Traffic analysis is possible because SSL/TLS encryption changes the contents of traffic, but has minimal impact on the size and timing of traffic. In May 2010, a research paper by researchers from Microsoft Research and Indiana University discovered that detailed sensitive user data can be inferred from side channels such as packet sizes. More specifically, the researchers found that an eavesdropper can infer the illnesses/medications/surgeries of the user, his/her family income and investment secrets, despite HTTPS protection in several high-profile, top-of-the-line web applications in healthcare, taxation, investment and web search.[35] Although this work demonstrated vulnerability of HTTPS to traffic analysis, the approach presented by the authors required manual analysis and focused specifically on web applications protected by HTTPS.

The fact that most modern websites, including Google, Yahoo!, and Amazon, use HTTPS causes problems for many users trying to access public Wi-Fi hot spots, because a Wi-Fi hot spot login page fails to load if the user tries to open an HTTPS resource.[36][37] Several websites, such as neverssl.com or nonhttps.com, guarantee that they will always remain accessible by HTTP.

Netscape Communications created HTTPS in 1994 for its Netscape Navigator web browser.[38] Originally, HTTPS was used with the SSL protocol. As SSL evolved into Transport Layer Security (TLS), HTTPS was formally specified by RFC 2818 in May 2000.

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HTTPS – Wikipedia

AES encryption

AES encryption

Encrypt and decrypt text with AES algorithm

As you see this implementation is using openssl instead of mcrypt and the result of the encryption/decryption is not compatible with each other.The mcrypt function will be deprecated feature in PHP 7.1.x

It is a webtool to encrypt and decrypt text using AES encryption algorithm. You can chose 128, 192 or 256-bit long key size for encryption and decryption. The result of the process is downloadable in a text file.

If you want to encrypt a text put it in the white textarea above, set the key of the encryption then push the Encrypt button.The result of the encryption will appear in base64 encoded to prevent character encoding problems.If you want to decrypt a text be sure it is in base64 encoded and is encrypted with AES algorithm!Put the encrypted text in the white textarea, set the key and push the Decrypt button.

When you want to encrypt a confidential text into a decryptable format, for example when you need to send sensitive data in e-mail.The decryption of the encrypted text it is possible only if you know the right password.

AES (acronym of Advanced Encryption Standard) is a symmetric encryption algorithm.The algorithm was developed by two Belgian cryptographer Joan Daemen and Vincent Rijmen.AES was designed to be efficient in both hardware and software, and supports a block length of 128 bits and key lengths of 128, 192, and 256 bits.

AES encryption is used by U.S. for securing sensitive but unclassified material, so we can say it is enough secure.

Please fill out our survey to help us improving aesencryption.net.

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AES encryption

Encrypt email messages – Outlook

When you need to protect the privacy of an email message, encrypt it. Encrypting an email message in Outlook means it’s converted from readable plain text into scrambled cipher text. Only the recipient who has the private key that matches the public key used to encrypt the message can decipher the message for reading. Any recipient without the corresponding private key, however, sees indecipherable text.

This article is specifically about encrypting and digitally signing a message with S/MIME. To understand the full list of email encryption options go to the article on Email Encryption in Office 365.

What happens if the recipient doesn’t have the corresponding private key? The recipient will see this message:

“This item cannot be displayed in the Reading Pane. Open the item to read its contents.”

And if the recipient tries to open the item, a dialog box opens with this message:

“Sorry, we’re having trouble opening this item. This could be temporary, but if you see it again you might want to restart Outlook. Your Digital ID name cannot be found by the underlying security system.”

Sending and viewing encrypted email messages requires both sender and recipient to share their digital ID, or public key certificate. This means that you and the recipient each must send the other a digitally signed message, which enables you to add the other person’s certificate to your Contacts. You cant encrypt email messages without a digital ID.

If you send an encrypted message to a recipient whose email setup doesnt support encryption, you’re offered the option of sending the message in an unencrypted format.

Any attachments sent with encrypted messages also are encrypted.

In message that you are composing, click File > Properties.

Click Security Settings, and then select the Encrypt message contents and attachments check box.

Compose your message, and then click Send.

When you choose to encrypt all outgoing messages by default, you can write and send messages the same as with any other messages, but all potential recipients must have your digital ID to decode or view your messages.

On the File tab. choose Options >Trust Center > Trust Center Settings.

On the Email Security tab, under Encrypted email, select the Encrypt contents and attachments for outgoing messages check box.

To change additional settings, such as choosing a specific certificate to use, click Settings.

In the message that you’re composing, on the Options tab, in the More Options group, click the dialog box launcher in the lower-right corner.

Click Security Settings, and then select the Encrypt message contents and attachments check box.

Compose your message, and then click Send.

When you choose to encrypt all outgoing messages by default, you can write and send messages the same as you do with any other messages. All potential recipients, however, must have your digital ID to decode or view those messages.

On the File tab, click Options > Trust Center > Trust Center Settings.

On the E-mail Security tab, under Encrypted e-mail, select the Encrypt contents and attachments for outgoing messages check box.

To change additional settings, such as choosing a specific certificate to use, click Settings.

In the message, on the Message tab, in the Options group on the ribbon, click the Encrypt Message Contents and Attachments button .

Note:If you don’t see this button, click the Options Dialog Box Launcher in the lower-right corner of the group to open the Message Options dialog box. Click the Security Settings button, and in the Security Properties dialog box, select Encrypt message contents and attachments. Click OK, and then close the Message Options dialog box.

Compose your message and send it.

Choosing to encrypt all outgoing messages means, in effect, your e-mail is encrypted by default. You can write and send messages the same as with any other e-mail messages, but all potential recipients must have your digital ID to decode your messages.

On the Tools menu, click Trust Center, and then click E-mail Security.

Under Encrypted e-mail, select the Encrypt contents and attachments for outgoing messages check box.

To change additional settings, such as choosing a specific certificate to use, click Settings.

Click OK twice.

See more here:
Encrypt email messages – Outlook

Download Sophos Free Encryption 2.40.1.11 – softpedia.com

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Sophos Free Encryption is an intuitive application that you can use to protect your sensitive data from unauthorized viewing. It can be handled by all types of users.

The interface of the program is based on a standard window with an intuitive layout, where you can add files into the secured environment using either the file browser, folder view or “drag and drop” method. You can add as many items as you want.

In order to encrypt data, you have to specify a target for the archive with the Sophos Free Encryption format (UTI), and assign a password to it. Alternatively, you can apply a key file as a dependency.

A few options are available for the encryption process. Therefore, you can create self-extracting executable files, securely delete the original items after encryption, compress data and save passwords in a history list.

Furthermore, you can use the default email client to send the encrypted archives via email after the process is done, as well as change the default file path to the passwords history list.

Sophos Free Encryption carries out a task rapidly and without errors, while using a low-to-moderate quantity of CPU and system memory, thus it does not affect the computer’s overall performance. We haven’t come across any difficulties in our tests, since the tool did not hang or crash.

Although it has not been updated for a pretty long time, Sophos Free Encryption offers users a simple alternative to secure their files, by turning them into encrypted archives.

File Encryption File Encrypter Encrypt Folder Encryption Encrypt Encrypter Decrypt

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Download Sophos Free Encryption 2.40.1.11 – softpedia.com

Does Skype use encryption? | Skype Support

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All Skype-to-Skype voice, video, file transfers and instant messages are encrypted. This protects you from potential eavesdropping by malicious users.

If you make a call from Skype to mobile and landline phones, the part of your call that takes place over the PSTN (the ordinary phone network) is not encrypted.

For example, in the case of group calls involving two users on Skype-to-Skype and one user on PSTN, then the PSTN part is not encrypted, but the Skype-to-Skype portion is.

For instant messages, we use TLS (transport-level security) to encrypt your messages between your Skype client and the chat service in our cloud, or AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) when sent directly between two Skype clients. Most messages are sent both ways, but in the future it will only be sent via our cloud to provide the optimal user experience.

Voice messages are encrypted when they’re delivered to you. However, after you have listened to a voice message, it is transferred from our servers to your local machine, where it is stored as an unencrypted file.

Skype uses the AES (Advanced Encryption Standard*), also known as Rijndael, which is used by the US Government to protect sensitive information, and Skype has for some time always used the strong 256-bit encryption. User public keys are certified by the Skype server at login using 1536 or 2048-bit RSA certificates.

*Skype is not responsible for the content of external sites.

To learn more about encryption, please visit our Security Center.

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Does Skype use encryption? | Skype Support

Encryption- Computer & Information Security – Information …

There are instructions at encrypt.stanford.edu that will walk you through the steps necessary to fulfill University security requirements for each of your devices. Before you begin, however, being prepared ahead of time for the following steps may help you streamline the encryption process.

In case something goes wrong during the encryption process, you should back up your computer before running the SWDE installer.

The School of Medicine recommends using CrashPlan: it’s asecure, monitored, convenient backup system and it’s free for School of Medicine affiliates. Additionally, the SoM can assist you in restoring your information from CrashPlan, in the event of a hard drive crash or lost computer. While it is not currently required, it is strongly recommended.

For instructions and help with installation, visit the School of Medicine’sCrashPlan Guide.

For desktop and laptop computers, Stanford Whole Disk Encryption (SWDE) installer makes certain that your computer has all the necessary requirements, and then guides you through the activation of your computer’s native encryption software (FileVault for Mac, and BitLocker for Windows).

(For mobile device encryption instructions, select your operating system:Apple/iOSorAndroid.)

Each time you access your system (on startup, after sleep/hibernation, etc), you use a “key” (password) to unlock your data. IF YOU CANNOT REMEMBER YOUR KEY, YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ACCESS YOUR ENCRYPTED DATA.

In case of a forgotten key, it is likely that someone at ITS will be able to help you recover your data. However, we still recommend the following:

Once you have selected your login password and backup method, you are ready to move on to theencryption process.

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Encryption- Computer & Information Security – Information …

Enable BitLocker on USB Flash Drives to Protect Data

Encrypting USB flash drives protects the data stored on the volume. Any USB flash drive formatted with FAT, FAT32, or NTFS can be encrypted with BitLocker. The length of time it takes to encrypt a drive depends on the size of the drive, the processing power of the computer, and the level of activity on the computer.

Before you enable BitLocker, you should configure the appropriate Removable Data Drive policies and settings in Group Policy and then wait for Group Policy to be refreshed. If you dont do this and you enable BitLocker, you might need to turn BitLocker off and then turn BitLocker back on because certain state and management flags are set when you turn on BitLocker.

To be sure that you can recover an encrypted volume, you should allow data-recovery agents and store recovery information in Active Directory. If you use a flash drive with earlier versions of Windows, the Allow Access To BitLocker-Protected Removable Data Drives From Earlier Versions Of Windows policy can ensure that you have access to the USB flash drive on other operating systems and computers. Unlocked drives are read-only.

To enable BitLocker encryption on a USB flash drive, do the following: 1. Insert the USB flash drive, click Start, and then click Computer. 2. Right-click the USB flash drive, and then click Turn On BitLocker. BitLocker initializes the drive. 3. On the Choose How You Want To Unlock This Drive page, choose one or more for the following options, and then click Next:

4. On the How Do You Want To Store Your Recovery Key page, click Save The Recovery Key To A File. 5. In the Save BitLocker Recovery Key As dialog box, choose a save location, and then click Save. 6. You can now print the recovery key if you want to. When you have finished, click Next. 7. On the Are You Ready To Encrypt This Drive page, click Start Encrypting. Do not remove the USB flash drive until the encryption process is complete. How long the encryption process takes depends on the size of the drive and other factors.

The encryption process does the following: 1. Adds an Autorun.inf file, the BitLocker To Go reader, and a Read Me.txt file to the USB flash drive. 2. Creates a virtual volume with the full contents of the drive in the remaining drive space. 3. Encrypts the virtual volume to protect it.USB flash drive encryption takes approximately 6 to 10 minutes per gigabyte to complete. The encryption process can be paused and resumed provided that you dont remove the drive.

As a result, when AutoPlay is enabled and you insert the encrypted drive into a USB slot on a computer running Windows 7, Windows 7 runs the BitLocker To Go reader, which in turn displays a dialog box. When you are prompted, enter the password, smart card PIN, or both to unlock the drive. Optionally, select Automatically Unlock On This Computer From Now On to save the password in an encrypted file on the computers system volume. Finally, click Unlock to unlock the volume so that you can use it.

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Enable BitLocker on USB Flash Drives to Protect Data